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Bone Shaker

Hot Wheels

Stamp Info

Name Value
Date of Issue September 29, 2018
Year 2018
Quantity 10,000,000
Denomination
First-Class Mail Forever
Denomination Value $0.50
Perforation or Dimension 1.56 x 0.98 in./39.624 x 24.892 mm
Series Hot Wheels
Series Time Span 2018
Issue Location Fort Worth, TX 76161
Postal Administration United States

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Layouts

Pane of 20 (10 Designs)

Quantity Produced - 5,000,000
Original Purchase Price: $10.00
SKU: 569004
Dimension: 9.125 x 6.435 in./231.775 x 163.449 mm
Printer: Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Process: Offset
Gum Type: Pressure-sensitive
Paper: Phosphor, Block Tag
Layout Number: “B” followed by five (5) single digits
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Press Sheet With Die-Cuts

Quantity Produced - Unknown
Original Purchase Price: $80.00
SKU: 569006
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First Day Cover

Quantity Produced - Unknown
Original Purchase Price: $9.40
SKU: 569016
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Digital Color Postmark

Quantity Produced - Unknown
Original Purchase Price: $16.50
SKU: 569021
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DCP Keepsake (Random Single)

Quantity Produced - Unknown
Original Purchase Price: $11.95
SKU: 569010
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Ceremony Memento

Quantity Produced - Unknown
Original Purchase Price: $29.95
SKU: 569034
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About Stamp

The miniature speed demon depicted on this stamp is the Bone Shaker. The distinctive Bone Shaker (2006) is a hot rod with a fierce-looking skull for a grille. The car has a massive short-block engine made to rattle your bones.

About Stamp Series

On September 29, 2018, in Fort Worth, TX, the U.S. Postal Service® will issue the Hot Wheels stamps (Forever® priced at the First-Class Mail® rate) in 10 designs, in a pressure-sensitive adhesive pane of 20 stamps. The stamps will go on sale nationwide September 29, 2018.

This issuance celebrates Hot Wheels®, the iconic die-cast cars that for the last 50 years have ignited the imaginations of generations of children around the world. Arranged in diagonal rows, the 20 stamps showcase photographer Len Rizzi’s images of 10 Hot Wheels cars — two of each design — speeding along a bright orange track. Each stamp features the name of the vehicle shown as follows:

  • First row, left to right: Purple Passion, Rocket-Bye-Baby, Rigor Motor, Rodger Dodger, and Mach Speeder.
  • Second row, left to right: Twin Mill, Bone Shaker, HW 40, Deora II, and Sharkruiser.

The iconic, curvy Hot Wheels logo appears in the top right corner of the pane. The back of the pane displays the Hot Wheels 50th anniversary logo. William J. Gicker served as art director. Greg Breeding designed the stamps and was the typographer.

In 2018, the U.S. Postal Service® celebrates Hot Wheels, the iconic die-cast cars that for the last 50 years have ignited the imaginations of generations of children around the world. Today, kids and adults alike still play with and collect these outrageously speedy scale models.

The idea for Hot Wheels was formed in the late 1960s. Mattel co-founder Elliot Handler set out to create a toy car that looked cooler and performed better than anything else out there. Until that point, toy cars had often been tiny reproductions of models that lacked pizzazz and speed.

Handler enlisted Harry Bentley Bradley, who had been working as a car designer at General Motors, and Jack Ryan, a former Raytheon rocket scientist. Together, they changed how kids play with toy cars. Inspired by the rebellious spirit of his own striking, customized yellow Chevrolet El Camino, Bradley drew modified versions of the era’s most visually appealing hot rods, muscle cars, and one-of-a-kind show cars.

From Bradley’s plans came a new breed of toy car: mini speed demons with bulging engines. Translucent, candy-colored paint that Mattel dubbed Spectraflame was applied directly on the cars’ zinc alloy bodies to give them an eye-catching metallic look. An aggressive appearance was important, but the tiny vehicles also needed to function like their real-life counterparts. With that in mind, Ryan helped design and build toy cars that were both agile and fast. The vehicles were equipped with space-age, red-striped, friction-resistant plastic wheels and independent suspension.

When Handler saw his team’s first die-cast car rolling along the floor, he said, “Those are some hot wheels,” and the brand name was born. By early 1968, Hot Wheels already had begun selling out of stores. Mattel soon introduced its iconic orange tracks, which provided children unlimited ways to test out stunts and racing skills. Today, children and their parents still love racing the eye-poppingly colorful, lightning-fast cars.

Arranged in diagonal rows, the 20 stamps showcase photographer Len Rizzi’s images of 10 Hot Wheels cars—two of each design—speeding along a bright orange track. Each stamp features the name of the vehicle shown in either the top left or top right corner and the words “USA” and “Forever” in either the bottom left or bottom right corner. The iconic curvy Hot Wheels logo appears in the top right corner of the pane. The back of the pane displays the Hot Wheels 50th anniversary logo.

William J. Gicker was the project’s art director. Greg Breeding designed the stamps and was the typographer.

The Hot Wheels stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. These Forever stamps are always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce price.

Colors

Pantone Orange 021, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black

Creators

Art Director: William J. Gicker, Washington, DC.
Designer: Greg Breeding, Charlottesville, VA.
Typographer: Greg Breeding, Charlottesville, VA.
Photographer: Len Rizzi, Bethesda, MD.
Modeler: Sandra Lane/Michelle Finn.

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Reference

USPS Postal Bulletin 22501. Copyright: USPS.

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